Food go into lungs? Possible?

I know that normally, when one swallows food, a flap of skin presses over the trachea to prevent food/liquids from entering. However, I was intake cheerios today, and I began coughing violently when one "go down the wrong tube". While I am no longer coughing, something in my chest/throat feels a bit amiss. Is it possible for food to enter the trachea/lungs lacking any noticeable symptoms, or would I still be coughing severely? If it is possible, what do I do if I think I own some food particle in my trachea?
Answers:
wow good question, try googling it
Wow, a lot of people are motto that you are going to die and I can assure you (if you're not immunodeficient) you will not die. Sometimes the epiglottis does not cover the trachea when you swallow something (it happens rarely) and food can travel into your trachea. If it's a small cheerio then the body have the ability to absorb this into your body. This happen to one of my classmate's dad. He was trying to catch M&Ms into his mouth and one go directly into his pharynx and into the trachea since there was no swallow reflex to trigger the epiglottis. He felt soreness in that nouns and when they went to the ER, the doctors didn't extract it because it would have be invasive and unnecessary. It was eventually absorbed by the body. If you still have a feeling it after like a week, then I would particularly see a doctor. If you are really worried then you can see a doctor now.
No, I don't think it's possible. When food "goes down the wrong tube", your body automatically coughs to force it fund up, then it will go down your esophagus. You might simply be feeling it in your esophagus. Just drink a bunch of sea to force it down. Don't worry about it.
I'm pretty sure that if food is lodged in your windpipe, you can't breathe. This is why you get going coughing a lot, to dislodge it from there and next I think it goes down your esophagus. So, my thought is that you don't hold a cheerio in your lungs. But I hope some medical person answers this too, I'm curious immediately.
Yes food can jump down the wrong tube into your lungs its called aspirating. If the food is left within the lung it can cause aspiration pneumonia which in markedly young, very older, and immuno suppressed people can cause demise if not treated. If you still feel close to your having pain turn to the doctors just to be safe. Source(s): Three years of nursing college
you can't do zilch about it... you are still breathing which is good! the worse baggage scenario would be an infection developing in your lungs from the aspiration... but didn't you know that cheerios and life saver are that shape for that reason so you can breath when it gets trapped contained by you trachea. you'll be fine.
Yes it is.
when you breath air, or swallow food, it goes down two diffrent tubes, it any goes down a certin one. you body can tell when when your breathing, or when your ingestion. but sometimes diseases can mess this up causing you to swallow air and breathe food.
its highly rare but it can happen. Source(s): dads a doctor
it can come to pass but in very exceptional cases. if it happens, it can cause "aspiration pneumonia" so, better take care.
It is possible for food to move about into the lungs, but very unlikely. Mostly occurs within elderly people with a specific disease that doesnt let the brain interpret whether you are eating or breathing so food and fluid fall into the lungs, build up and rot, eventually killing the host. I somehow doubt you own that.

Try drinking a large glass of dampen (quickly, chug it if you can) to see if you feel any better.


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